Notifications
Clear all

batteries

Page 2 / 2

admin
Posts: 259
Admin
Topic starter
(@admin)
Member
Joined: 1 year ago

Lipo Battery, its full name is lithium polymer battery, people also called Li-po battery, or more correctly lithium-ion polymer battery (abbreviated as LiPo, LIP, Li-poly and others). Lipo is a rechargeable battery of lithium-ion technology using a polymer electrolyte instead of a liquid one. High conductivity semisolid polymers form this electrolyte. These lipo batteries provide a higher specific energy than other lithium-battery types. It is  a newer type of battery now used in many consumer electronics devices. They have been gaining in popularity in the radio control industry over the last few years, and are now the most popular choice for anyone looking for long run times and high power. 

A battery is constructed from rectangular cells which are connected together to form the battery. A cell which can be considered a battery in itself, holds a nominal voltage of 3.7V. By connecting more of these in series, the voltage can increase to 7.4V for a 2 cell battery, 14.8V for a 4 cell battery and so on. By connecting more batteries in parallel the capacity can be increased. Often you will see numbers like 3S2P, which mean the battery as 4 cells (4S) connected in series, and there are 2 cell sets connected in parallel (2P) , giving a total number of 6 individual sells in the battery. So the number of cells is what defines the voltage of the battery. Having a higher voltage means the battery can provide more power to drive bigger motors, however more power does not necessarily mean the battery will provide energy for longer, that is defined by the battery capacity.

 

 

 

 

6 Replies
admin
Posts: 259
Admin
Topic starter
(@admin)
Member
Joined: 1 year ago

1. Never fly beyond the operating range of temperatures. If you haven't noticed, the batteries get really hot after a flight and if you think you can push it by a couple of degrees, just don't The battery temp when you take it out will probably increase by 2 or 3 times that amount since the heat sink on the drone can radiate so much heat. Similarly....

2. Don't fly with warm batteries. Fly with room temperature batteries. You don't want to risk overheating the drone/battery. This means that you should not charge a battery and immediately put it in the drone and take it up. No matter how cold it is (unless it's like close to freezing), your battery will only increase in temperature during flight.

3. Never charge batteries immediately after a flight. Notice how batteries warm up after a charge? You want to wait until the batteries reach room temperature before charging. And remember, even if the outside is cool to the touch, the inside might still be warm. I would recommend a good 1 hour at least before you charge up your batteries.

4. If you don't plan to use a battery within 1-2 days, I would recommend charging it to 50%. No swelling and in case you don't fly it for longer, you won't have to worry about it. Furthermore, you can just top it off to 100% the morning or night before you want to fly, and since you're only charging it for 50%, the battery won't heat up as much.

Reply
admin
Posts: 259
Admin
Topic starter
(@admin)
Member
Joined: 1 year ago

https://forumla.localad.com/battery-guide/

Reply
Page 2 / 2

©2021 LocalAd

CONTACT US

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Log in with your credentials

or    

Forgot your details?

Create Account